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Pogoplug drives mapped as network drives

It would be great to have the Pogoplug drives mapped as network drives under My Computer. Pogoplug Companion at the moment maps the drives as local disks, this doesn't quite feel right in the user experience. It would be great to be able to map the drives as network drives i.e. Map drive L: to \192.168.1.74\Photos (Pogoplug IP on LAN). This would mean that to map a drive under My Computer you wouldn't need to use Pogoplug Companion.

Dean Turner

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I agree. This would be a easy an excellent feature to implement. This is something we should expect from Pogoplug eventually. Would be ridiculous to not have this as a basic feature.

Justin M.
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It makes it an absolute nightmare as it currently stands to try and have a central repository for the windows machines in the house that need to have drives mapped

Ͻ Һ ԐωϓƒⱤט❘ҬⱢ◯◯Ᵽ
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Dean and Justin, thank you for your suggestions, and I want all of our users to know that we have documented this feature request to our product team.

Evan
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Sure why can't you put a sftp server on it you already have ssh. WinSCP works great can even synchronize files and I'm sure there are other ways of doing it too!

Dan Prizner
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"Dean and Justin, thank you for your suggestions, and I want all of our users to know that we have documented this feature request to our product team."

That's great, you've "documented a feature request".  Can you explain what that means?  Does it mean that something will actually be done, or that you've just added it to a list of features that you might someday decide to work on?  If you're going to actually do this, when will it it be done?

I need this feature, so "when" is a really important question.  If you're not going to allow mapping of network drives real soon, then I'll proceed to an archlinux install.

Paul Pritchard
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This "feature" was something that I thought would be standard. It never occurred to me that a device for sharing storage that resides on my local network could not be directly mapped as a network drive on my local network. I was disappointed when I installed my Pogoplug today and found out that it does not do this. I'll be somewhat satisfied with the software that allows my PC to access the storage, but I very much look forward to a proper implementation of LAN access through Pogoplug.

Matt Holley
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I didn't want to wait around until they implemented this feature, assuming they ever do.  I think it's been a long-standing, multi-year request that they've never fulfilled.  I consider drive mapping to be the main reason to have a device like this.  So I've installed archlinux (http://archlinuxarm.org/platforms/armv5/pogoplug-v2-pinkgray) on my PogoPlug Classic, and was able to uninstall the the "PogoPlug Companion" software that only seemed to work intermittently anyway, included advertisements, stuck an unwanted "cloud" folder into Windows Explorer, and has features removed or added without warning.  Now I can map drives and I'll be installing a MiniDLNA server.

Installation of archlinux requires some technical savvy, so it's not for everyone.  Cloud Engines *should* have made it easy for their customers, but they seem to be focused more on cloud services than their hardware devices...probably it's a financial thing, but the customers are suffering.

Paul Pritchard
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I subscribe to everyone here saying the LAN access is a must have feature for Pogoplug devices. I find it very weird the implementation of a Gigabit network port on a device that is unable to communicate via LAN. Assuminig a download speed of 10Mbps as an average ADSL/3G connection, it doesn't make any sense to implement a 1000Mbps network port, unless you clearly have in mind, from the beginning, the implementation of LAN access. In regards to Evan's reply << "Dean and Justin, thank you for your suggestions, and I want all of our users to know that we have documented this feature request to our product team." >>... your good intentions are genuine and will lead (hopefully) to something good. However, my message for your production team is this: "Guys, don't upgrade the Gigabit Ethernet port to Optical Fibre (yet), if you don't plan to implement LAN access - doesn't help anyone and won't sell more..." 

Alexandru Balasescu
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I understand you've documented the request.  Could you tell us if there has been any response?  Can you provide a timeline as to when we can expect to hear if this will be worked on, and if so, when we can expect to see an update with this functionality?  Alternatively, if there is no plan to implement this any time soon, an explanation from the decision makers why not?

Michael Gray
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I emailed them the other day about read/write permissions and within an hour I had received the "we have logged your suggestion" message and it was in the evening.  As I can see that this suggestion was made in July and this thread doesnt seem to have been concluded, I think Pogo is spending more time on responding to 'suggestions' than working on their shitty product.  

Dont get me wrong, the hardware is quit genius and the possibilities are nearly endless considering the price tag of $30 I got it for.  But the implementation of said hardware is abysmal and most people who purchased this product assumed it would come standard with basic essential features.  Instead, before I even set up my drive and tried it out for the first time, I was pushed to buy the subscription and premium services.  Phewww.  I do not even know how this company is still around, Im installing arch linux on it tomorrow and I will never utter the name PogoPlug  again, even when asked how I set up storage on my network specifically.  

Maybe from time and again I will drop in on the forums to see if any customers seem pleased with new updates...however I probably will never look back because its hard to believe this "haphazardly-built-shit-filled-mine-field" of a product could have gone so wrong in the first place...Probably from greed I guess.  The threads I read about arch linux running on pogo are literally polar opposites as ones here.  Everyone is happy as clams.  Here its just utter shock from new users first coming to grips with how utterly handicapped the software is.

Good luck to you all no matter how you decide to fix this headache...waiting it out or going with arch-linux...either way its going to take much more time and patience than expected. 

Ccarli01
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The very fact that you cannot map this device as a drive, when it is plugged into your own network is a total farce.

I've been struggling with this device for over a year now, and the support is wilfully awful.

For serious use I bought a DNS-320, it's utterly utterly configurable compared to this toy.

You'll be waiting forever to get this functionality, it was a total waste of time to even come here and suggest it.

Abandon hope.

Gary Threlfall
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I think the issue is slightly more complicated than many people are thinking about.  The filesystem at the Pogoplug device can be any filesystem supported by busybox. It could be case sensitive, insensitive, HFS+, Linux, NTFS, FAT, exFAT.  Supporting JUST NTFS to Windows 7 might be what everyone wants. But, I have PCs with XP, Win7, Mac and Linux.

Next, all of these files are referenced via the web with universal IDs.  This is what Pogoplug was made to do... It wasn't just designed as a NAS server. It was made to do this from any device through the Internet.  This is an amazing device for what it cost.  If you don't believe me, try and piece one together. It would be tough.

Gary Deen
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@Gary Dean 

You certainly make a good point, and I agree with you.  That said, there are work-arounds that add extremely useful functionality (the aforementioned SAMBA support), I believe it would be to their benefit to include these features.  Like you said, perhaps there are some disk formats that may not work, I would hope that could be worked through and figured out.  But even so, I believe the majority of people users could benefit from limited native network share capabilities.

Agreed, it is incredible for the price.  Here is to making it even better!

Ma Olson
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The lack of ablity to readily map a local network drive or use as SAMBA server is the reason I returned this product.  This limitation should be clearly stated on the box, b/c it was assume that this functionality would exist by default.  Otherwise, the product has very specific and limited usefulness.  However, I understand why they like the web portal approach b/c it allows them to upsell services with monthly fees.

Landon Tapzoo
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Can someone explain what is the difference between being mapped as a network drive versus a local drive?  Isn't it possible to make a local drive accesible on your network?  I am able to make my D drive accessible on my PC for the network.  Maybe I am not understanding so please pardon my ignorance if I am.  I am just curious and hope someone can explain this to me in a very non technical manner.

msmorgan69
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Rafaela,

A local drive, for example, is your C: drive under My Computer. It is the physical harddrive(s) within your computer.

A network drive, is when you assign a letter, for example X: to a shared folder on another computer.

 

So you have your D drive being shared across your network; say another computer wanted to access that D drive, and have it as a letter i.e. X: under My Computer - that would be caled mapping a network drive.

 

If that doesn't make much sense, read this: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090123095705AALH2wO

 

Hope this helps :)

I've been working with small to enterprise networks for a number of years and I'm also completing Cisco certification. So if there's anything else you'd like me to clarify just ask :)

Dean Turner
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So in essence what we are saying in this thread is when would like to be able to map our Pogoplug devices as network drives, as opposed to having to use Pogoplug's Companion software.

Dean Turner
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OK. I understand. So as it is not if another computer wanted to map my D drive on their computer as "X" they could or could not?  And am I understanding that if I close and exit the companion software the drive that its mapped on my computer will disappear?  I have never really tried that but if that is the case and I can only have it mapped while running that software then I totally agree with you!!

msmorgan69
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If you wanted to map your D drive on another computer, yes it is possible.

 

You are completely correct, if you exit companion the drives will disappear!

 

What's more is; we all would like the functionality to map the drive without having to install companion!

Dean Turner
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  • Having the software running or not to access the drives.  This really is what windows does. The software makes sure the file system drivers are there and the proper network connection remains and access to the drive is OK.

  • SAMBA/CIFS there's also AFS.  These things are security nightmares and network centric. Pogoplug opened up access to the bigger network using some LDAP lookup to their servers then back to your server.  THAT's the point of this server. It works anywhere. Second, you don't have to worry about security (as much) because the IDs are not microsoft domain, or Mac, or kerberos, or what have you.

  • NFS, net use, all of them maintain drivers that manage how your computer sees the data on the drive. In this case it can be seen from any computer. (Mac/linux/Windows). Pogoplug uses the ppfs which is a compromise to support the largest number of machines.

 

So, the software gives you local drive access (X:) even though it could be miles away. When the X: is on your local network, it acts like it is on your local network. (much faster).

Gary Deen
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The functionality for this feature is probably a few lines of code away, as the Pogoplug hardware essentially runs on a Linux core.

However, the chances that Pogoplug will add the feature is zero whilst they can still possibly see a way of charging you money for it.

It's irrelevant that you have bought the hardware, there are still schoolboy errors in the code that have been there from day one, all yet to be resolved.

But they have your money, what can you do ?

Maybe Pogoplug can convince us all to "upgrade" to one of the newer shiny models, the models that should have been put on the back-burner while they fixed the existing issues on the models we have all paid for.

My D-Link DNS-320 sits next to the Pogoplug, happily never giving me any cryptic error messages, allowing me to map it's drives in any number of ways, and like the Pogo I can access all the files over the internet, but without having to pay Pogoplug for the privilege.

 

Why do I have a Pogoplug again ?

Gary Threlfall
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A gripe I have is that even if you run the Pogoplug Companion software, the "P" drive capability isn't a full-fledged drive in Windows' eyes.  Notably, you cannot use the P: drive as a destination for Windows backups.  In Windows 7 built in backup utility, "P:" is not recognized as valid backup destination so you can't have your Windows image backups etc. saved to your Pogoplug storage.

I would happily settle for Pogoplug doing whatever is necessary to make the current drive functionality work more completely.

Michael Gray
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@Gary  I'd guess you have a Pogoplug because it was cheap, that's why I have mine.  :)

As much as I complain, I am finding it useful, with the samba support I put on it, but also the native Pogoplug software hosting things over the internet, especially to my tablet and phone.

That said, I'm looking at moving to Owncloud hosted on a netbook I'm using as a server.

Ma Olson
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(Quote)

A gripe I have is that even if you run the Pogoplug Companion software, the "P" drive capability isn't a full-fledged drive in Windows' eyes.  Notably, you cannot use the P: drive as a destination for Windows backups.  In Windows 7 built in backup utility, "P:" is not recognized as valid backup destination so you can't have your Windows image backups etc. saved to your Pogoplug storage.

I would happily settle for Pogoplug doing whatever is necessary to make the current drive functionality work more completely.

 

 

I was just going to ask about this same thing.  I guess I misunderstood the explanation I was given before as I thought as long as I had the companion software running the drive would show up on my computer.  And it does, but when I open up my image software that I back up with, ShadowProtect, the drive is not listed on there at all.  And if I try and find it like a network drive its not there either.  I had thought it would be since the software was running.  Is there a way to make it show or a work around for this?

 

msmorgan69
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One of the biggest problems to accessing a drive of any kind and sharing files directly is from a virus or something else similar could attack those files easily.

We have have our computers that access the internet on a separate part of our lan than our regular workstations.  They are accessed via VNC(remote software). Files cannot be transferred.

Most people are not protecting themselves well enough from the internet and i would think that is one reason why POGOPLUG does not want their software to attach to the POGOPLUG deivices in a direct shared way. I can understand that. It would create more headaches from them on the support end.

paul purvis
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Yeah I just got a Pogoplug today and while trying to set it up to sync with folders on my computer, I was surprised to find that it doesn't show up as a network drive.  This actually confused me a lot.  I thought I did something wrong, or I didn't do something, which is how I ended up here on this forum.  So it just doesn't show up I guess.  No wonder they made the companion software.  I was hoping to avoid installing yet another program that would have to run constantly in the background on my computer... ugh.  But something doesn't make sense here... for an "NAS adapter", a function as basic as showing up on a network couldn't have just been overlooked.  It must have been because of some technical reason that the people making decisions at Pogoplug decided not to include this function.  I cannot believe it was an oversight.  Now I just wish I knew what that reason was...  And if they have come up with a solution...  And when that solution will be implemented...

I'm gonna try out this companion software since it's free.  If it doesn't do what I need it to, back my Pogoplug goes... sigh.

subjonas
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Guys,

The Pogoplug is not a NAS, probably won't be, so let's quit wishing that it is one.  :-) 

It's a different sort of critter; it's a "plug computer" -- for a short description of them see:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plug_computer   Plug computers are basically servers,

My WD media player sees the PP as a "media server" and not a "network share",  Because the PP is seen as a server, the media player can request data be pushed from the PP to the media player.  The media player pulls data from other drives in the network that are seen as "network shares".  There is a distinction here between the two ways of accessing data.

SInce the PP drives can also be seen by the PC, It can, for the most part, be treated as another drive on the network within it's limitations.  It also can do things my other drives cannot do -- it can be on the internet to be accesable from the net.  This is cool.

My new ASUS router has a feature that enables me to add a drive to it.  I suppose it would be called a NAS in this way.  ASUS added a new feature in the more recent firmwares that enables setting up the drive to be accessable via the internet -- just like PP, and ASUS calls it AiCloud.  Haven't set it up yet with a drive and all, but I think if and when I do, it would act a lot like the PP.

So, my "gripe" with the PP is not that it isn't something else, too, it is that after all this time, the software and firmware to make it do what it's designed to do should be working better than it does, so let's hope that gets bullet-proofed first!

Mike Antonucci
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It's a box that runs software.

Adding the functionality of mappable drives is not beyond it's scope, but I have the feeling the company would rather find a way to charge us for this rather than add it for free.

That's the most likely reason it's not part of the feature set.

Gary Threlfall